Blue Origin delays New Glenn launch till Late 2022

Blue Origin Delays Launch 

Things don’t seem to work in the favor of private space company Blue Origin as after losing out on a Space Force contract, they have announced that they have pushed its New Glenn maiden flight to the fourth quarter of 2022. The aim of a company is launching of National Security Space Launch (NSSL) payloads future in addition to civil contracts in the coming future. 

New Glenn is a reusable orbital rocket of Blue Origin that has been under development for years. Several features are boosted by the private space company as New Glenn offers the ability to launch and land in 95-percent of weather conditions in addition to twice the payload capacity of competing spacecraft. 

New Glenn- 25 Flights Durability

Blue Origin

Blue origin states that the New Glenn is built in such a way that it can easily handle at least 25 flights. The idea being the reduction of cost by reusing the first stage with speeding up launches. Blue Origin explained that half a dozen hydraulic legs aid the first stage in landing on a moving ship. 

Blue Origin clarified that the New Glenn launch is postponed to match the demand from its commercial customers. The company is aware of its moves and this move is to satisfy the changes to meet customer needs and while the company will fulfill the commercial contracts, pursue a large and growing commercial market, and enter into new civil space launch contracts.

Space Force Decision

The company specifically cites the reason for the schedule change being Space Force’s decision to skip over New Glenn for the Phase 2 Launch Services Procurement contract. And Blue Origin is confident enough to join hands with the government and prove itself to be able to launch NSSL payloads.

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